ARUGULA

Arugula.jpg

Storage:

  • Wash and spin dry before placing in a plastic bag in the refrigerator
  • 32 to 36 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Best if used within 1 week

Nutrition Information:

  • Low fat, cholesterol free, very low sodium
  • Excellent source of vitamins A and C
  • Good source of folate and calcium

Culinary Tips:

  • Add to lettuce or spinach for a spicy addition to salad.
  • Make an arugula salad by adding a soft cheese, dried fruits, grated carrots, and walnuts tossed in your favorite vinaigrette.
  • Add to sandwiches and omelets.
  • Quickly braise or sauté and add to your pasta with grated parmesan.
  • Add cooked arugula to quiche and lasagna.

Recipes:

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BASIL

Storage:

  • Rinse herbs
  • Pat dry with paper towel
  • 54 degrees Fahrenheit is the lowest safe temperature for storage
  • Can be stored at room temperature if you place the stems in a glass of water and mist the leaves
  • Stores about 7 days

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in saturated fat, no cholesterol, low in sodium
  • Very high in: calcium, iron, manganese, magnesium, phosphorous, potassium, Vit A and Vit B6
  • High in niacin and riboflavin.

Culinary Tips:

  • Chopping, mincing or crushing fresh herbs releases their full flavor.
  • If you don’t plan to use your fresh herbs at once, you can blanch the leaves in boiling water for three to five seconds and refrigerate or freeze. The herbs will retain their nice color.
  • Puree herbs with a small amount of water and freeze in ice cube trays. Store ice cubes in a plastic bag and use to season soups, sauces and beverages.

Recipes:

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BEANS

Beans-Pole.jpg

Varieties: Pole, long

Storage:

  • Refrigerate beans in plastic bag
  • Best if used within 1 week

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in sodium and calories, no cholesterol
  • High in vitamins A & C
  • Notable amounts of magnesium and folates

Culinary Tips:

  • Snip off stem ends
  • Roast: Preheat oven to 500°F. Spread beans on a baking sheet or in a pan large enough to hold them in a single layer. Coat with 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil. Roast, turning once halfway through cooking, until tender and beginning to brown, about 10 minutes.
  • Sauté: Heat 2 teaspoons walnut oil in a large skillet. Add beans; cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes.
  • Steam: Place beans in a steamer basket over 1 inch of water in a large pot set over high heat. Cover and steam for 5 minutes.
  • Microwave: Place beans in a large glass baking dish. Add 1/4 cup broth (or water). Cover and microwave on High for 4 minutes.

Recipes:

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Beets

Storage:

  • Cut off stems one inch from the crown.
  • Refrigerate the unwashed beet roots.
  • Summer beets will stay in good condition for 2-3 weeks.
  • Wash and spin greens and place in a plastic bag in the refrigerator.
  • Greens are best when eaten within 3 days.

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium
  • Excellent source of folate

Culinary Tips:

  • Raw beets can be grated into a salad.
  • Scrub the beet clean, no need to peel.
  • Bake the beets to enhance their natural sweetness. Slice the washed and unpeeled beets into ¼ inch thick slices. Arrange slices on a lightly oiled baking pan and season with thyme or tarragon. Add a small amount of water or apple juice and cover with foil. Put in 350° oven for 25 minutes until fork-tender.
  • Beets can also steamed and boiled. Scrub beets clean but leave skins on until after cooking to minimize color and flavor loss. Run whole, cooked beets under cold water and rub off the skins. 1 ½ inch beets take 30 minutes to cook in steam and 15-20 minutes in boiling water. Serve whole, sliced or grated.
  • Toss grated beets with grated carrots, apples, oil and vinegar dressing. A touch of plain yogurt makes for a wonderful color transformation.
  • The greens can be steamed, sautéed, and mixed with pasta with cheese.

Recipes:

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Bok choy (and other Asian greens)

Varieties: Bok choi, vitamin greens

Storage:

  • Wrap Bok Choi is a damp towel or put it in a plastic bag and store in the hydrator drawer of the refrigerator.
  • Store for up to one week. Leaves will wilt if allowed to dry out.

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium
  • Excellent source of vitamin A and C
  • Good source of folate

Culinary Tips:

  • Separate stalks from main stem and rinse leaves and stem. Pat dry.
  • For stir-frying separate green leaves from the white stalk. Chop stalks into 1 inch wide diagonal chunks. Cut leaves into small pieces.
  • The stem needs to be cooked a few minutes longer than the leaves.
  • Bok Choi makes a great stir-fry. First sauté onions until they begin to soften. Then add the Bok Choi stems, tofu chunks, soy sauce, and grated ginger root. Add the bok choi leaves last. Serve with rice or noodles.
  • Sauté or steam bok choi and toss with a favorite marinade.
  • Toss cooked bok choi with a light coating of toasted sesame oil, soy sauce, and rice vinegar. 

Recipes:

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Broccoli

Storage:

  • Keep unwashed, trimming only the large leaves.
  • Store in a perforated, plastic bag in the refrigerator.
  • It will keep fresh for several days.

Nutrition Information:

  • Low fat, saturated fat free, low sodium, cholesterol free
  • High in vitamin C and folate
  • Good source of dietary fiber and potassium

Culinary Tips:

  • First rinse the broccoli. If necessary, soak upside down in cold, salted water.
  • Broccoli will take 8-15 minutes to steam, 4-8 to blanch. Test for doneness by piercing the stalks with a knife point. The knife will pierce easily, but the broccoli should remain crunchy. If you plan to use it later cool by plunging immediately in cold water. Drain and pat dry.
  • Steam or blanch broccoli before sautéing or stir-frying.
  • The stalks and stems of the broccoli are edible, too. They cook in the same amount of time if you peel the outer skin. Insert a paring knife blade under the skin at the base and pull up. The skin pulls off easily, breaking off at the buds. Cut stalks into think julienne strips or diagonal slices for soups or sautées.
  • Combine cooked broccoli with garlic and olive oil, sprinkle with cheese.
  • Add to pizza, quiche, and pasta dishes.

Recipes:

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Butternut squash

Butternut.jpg

Storage:

  • You’ll see best storage results when you stash squash in a cool, dry spot. For most winter squash, store at 50º to 55º F with relative humidity of 60 to 70 percent.
  • Storage life is typically 2 to 3 months without significant loss in quality.

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free
  • Excellent source of vitamins A and C
  • Good source of fiber, potassium and magnesium

Culinary Tips:

  • Roast with butter and brown sugar or maple syrup
  • Cut squash into chunks and boil until tender

Recipes:

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CARROTS

Varieties: Nelson, Artist, Bolero, Deep Purple

Storage:

  • Twist off tops and refrigerate carrots in a plastic bag.

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, low sodium, cholesterol free, low calorie
  • Excellent source of vitamin A
  • Good source of vitamin C

Culinary Tips:

  • Scrub carrots under running water. Peeling removes the nutrients located just under the skin.
  • Eat carrots raw to receive the most nutrients, cut into sticks or grate into many types of salads.
  • Slice and steam for 5-10 min or sauté in butter, top with honey for a sweet dish.
  • Add to soups, stir-fries, stews, & casseroles.
  • Steam and puree carrots add cream, onions, leeks, freshly grated ginger, or soy sauce for a simple soup.
  • To roast carrots, cut in large chunks, dot with butter and place in an oven-proof dish. Cover and bake in a 350° oven for 40 min.

Recipes:

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Chinese cabbage

Varieties: Minuet, Blues

Storage:

  • Refrigerate in plastic bag. Do not wash until ready to use.

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in calories and sodium
  • High in potassium, calcium, vitamins A and C, and folate

Culinary Tips:

  • Chinese cabbage is great when used in kimchi and spring rolls

Recipes:

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Cilantro

Cilantro.jpg

Varieties: Calypso

Storage:

  • Put it in a jar of water in the fridge as you would with flowers, cover with a plastic bag

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in calories and sodium, zero cholesterol
  • Very high in vitamins A and K
  • High in iron and manganese
  • Notable amount of folates and B6

Culinary Tips:

  • Add to scrambled eggs for extra color and flavor
  • Add to potato salad
  • A chutney or pesto is a great way to preserve a big bunch of cilantro for future use
  • Add some cilantro to a piece of bread slathered in cream cheese (or avocado) and you've got a much more interesting meal
  • Add it to slaw
  • Toss some cilantro in with your lettuce for an extra pop of flavor
  • Cocktails: Try muddled cilantro and cucumber with gin

Recipes:

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Cucumbers

Storage:

  • Store cucumbers in the hydrator drawer of your fridge for up to 1 week
  • You can also wrap each cucumber individually in a paper towel, then put all cucumbers wrapped in paper towels inside the plastic bag.Put the plastic bag with the cucumbers in a refrigerator.This method can keep them fresh for one week.
  • Sliced cucumbers deteriorate very quickly.

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, sodium free, cholesterol free, low calorie
  • Good source of vitamin C

Culinary Tips:

  • Add cucumber slices to a sandwich.
  • Toss sliced cucumbers with plain yogurt or mayo and fresh dill
  • Toss sliced cucumbers with your favorite vinaigrette dressing.

Recipes:

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DIAKON RADISH


EDAMAME

Storage:

  • Try to cook edamame pods as soon as possible after purchasing. They can be stored a day or two in the refrigerator before cooking.
  • Once cooked, the edamame pods should be stored in the refrigerator for up to several days.
  • Freezing is another option -- you can freeze whole cooked pods, or shell the beans and freeze them.
  • To reheat the frozen beans, cook them in boiling water for a few minutes.

Nutrition Information:

  • One cup is 189 calories
  • Very high amounts of manganese and copper
  • High in folate
  • Notable amount of vitamin C

Culinary Tips:

  • Bring a pot of water or lightly salted water to boiling in a large saucepan. Add the pods and return the water to boiling; boil pods about 5 minutes. Do not overcook them or they will get mushy.
  • Drain the beans and cool them under cold running water or immerse them in ice water to stop the cooking.
  • To shell the beans, gently squeeze the pods with your fingers to release them. Or have fun simply putting the pods in your mouth and popping the beans out of their skins.
  • Some people serve edamame cold and will refrigerate the cooked beans for an hour or two after cooking. Either way, you may want to sprinkle them with a coarse salt or dip them in soy sauce. And of course, they are ready to use in your favorite recipes (see below for ideas).

Recipes:

Photo by Olivia Nava M.

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Eggplant

Varieties: Sicilian, Chinese, Italian

Storage:

  • Store at room temperature, or in refrigerator for 1-3 days
  • Keep in a cool spot away from direct sunlight
  • Best consumed fresh!

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, low in calories
  • Good source of dietary fiber

Culinary Tips:

  • Can be peeled but is not necessary
  • Slice and lightly salt, let sit for 10 minutes then press gently with paper towels. This removes excess water
  • Grill with other veggies
  • Add to pasta dishes
  • Dip in eggs, then in breadcrumbs. Sautee until lightly browned, add seasoning or hot sauce

Recipes:

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FINGERLING POTATOES

Storage:

  • Store in a dark environment around 45-50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • In a paper bag at the top of basement steps works for some

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free
  • Excellent source of vitamin C

Culinary Tips:

  • Boil, roast, pan-fry or grill

Recipes:

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GARLIC

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 68 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit for short-term storage; 30 to 32 degrees Fahrenheit for long-term storage
  • Stores 1-2 months short-term; 9+ months for long-term
  • Don't store near potatoes (they give off gases that will accelerate spoilage of both).

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free

Culinary Tips:

  • One clove of raw garlic finely minced or pressed releases as much flavor as a dozen or so cooked cloves
  • When baking squash or eggplant, try placing a couple cloves of garlic inside the vegetable where it will roast without burning and infuse the squash or eggplant with extra flavor
  • Need to peel a lot of garlic? Watch this video to learn how to peel an entire head of garlic in about 10 second!

Recipes:

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Garlic Scapes

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Refrigerate for up to one month

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in sodium and calories
  • High in vitamin K and folate.

Culinary Tips:

  • Remove stalk tip above the pod before preparing
  • Using gentler heat will prevent toughening the texture
  • Great for pesto or hummus

Recipes:

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Green Onions

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Refrigerate and place root-end in shallow water to extend storage time

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, very low sodium, cholesterol free, low-calorie

Culinary Tips:

  • Make a green onion infused oil
  • You can pickle green onions too!
  • Green onion pesto? Yep! Try combining them with ginger, salt and vegetable oil in a heated pan, and using the pesto to glaze your favorite meat!

Recipes:

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 Greens Mix

 Varieties:

Storage:

  • 32-36 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores up to 14 days (must maintain a consistently cold temperature to prevent damage)

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in calories and sodium, zero cholesterol
  • High in vitamin A
  • Notable amounts of vitamins C and K

Culinary Tips:

  • Be sure to keep your greens consistently cold until you are ready to prepare them
  • Greens mix is good for salads; and as bedding for quinoa, couscous, or your favorite meat

Recipes:
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KALE

Varieties: curly, dino (lacinato)

Storage:

  • Just above freezing, though your crisper should work well also
  • Stores up to 3 weeks in optimum conditions

Nutrition Information:

  • Low fat, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium
  • Excellent source of vitamins A and C
  • Good source of calcium and potassium

Culinary Tips:

  • Kale is a nutrient powerhouse, so be sure to cook it gently so you don't cook the nutrients out of it
  • Try blanching as an approach to cooking kale
  • Make a sauté, adding the kale at the end for one-to-two minutes of cooking to wilt the leaves
  • Haven't joined the green smoothie craze yet? Kale will make you crazy about green smoothies

Recipes:

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Kohlrabi

Storage:

  • Just above freezing, though your crisper should work well also
  • Stores 2-4 weeks with tops; 2-3 months without tops

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, cholesterol free, very low sodium, low calorie
  • Excellent source of vitamin C
  • Good source of fiber.

Culinary Tips:

  • Working on increasing the amount of raw foods you eat? Peel and discard the outer layer of the bulb, slice as you would radishes and add to your salad
  • Add kohlrabi to your favorite "cream of ..." soup
  • Roast it, steam it, or even make kohlrabi fritters
  • Kohlrabi is not only versatile when it comes to preparation, it is also yet another nutrient powerhouse

Recipes:

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LEAF LETTUCE

Varieties:

Storage:

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, very low sodium, cholesterol free, low calorie
  • High in vitamin A
  • Good source of folate

Culinary Tips:

Recipes:
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 Leeks

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Just above freezing; though your crisper should work well also
  • Stores up to 3 months at 32 degrees Fahrenheit

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, cholesterol free, very low sodium
  • Excellent source of vitamin A
  • Good source of vitamin C and folate

Culinary Tips:

  • Avoid overcooking to retain texture
  • Use dark-green trimmed leaves to flavor stock
  • Try raw, thinly-sliced leeks in your salad

Recipes:

Photo courtesy of Olivia Nava M.

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MELONS

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 35 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit for cantaloupe; 45 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit for honeydew and honey ball melons
  • Cantaloupe stores 10-14 days; honey dew/honey ball melons stores up to 3 weeks

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in sodium, zero cholesterol
  • High in vitamins A, C and potassium

Culinary Tips:

  • Contain no starch reserves after picked from vine, so sugar content decreases rapidly after harvesting
  • Good source of vitamin C and potassium, and also have a high water content
  • Preparation is easy! Simply halve the melon and remove the seeds and strings. Then, quarter, cube, wedge, or scoop to your liking!

Recipes:

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OKRA

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 45-50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores 7-14 days

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, cholesterol free, very low sodium, low calorie
  • Excellent source of vitamin C
  • Good source of folate, magnesium and fiber

Culinary Tips:

  • High in fiber, vitamin C, folate, calcium, potassium, and antioxidants
  • Using a knife, carefully remove the rough cap
  • Try cutting it cylindrically without exposing the seeds, spread out on a baking pan and sprinkle with salt and vinegar. Place in the sun for a couple hours to dry. Then cook in your favorite gumbo recipe!

Recipes:

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Onions

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 68 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit for short-term storage; 32 degrees Fahrenheit for long-term storage
  • Stores up to a month short-term, and as long as 9 months long-term

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, very low sodium; cholesterol free
  • High in vitamin C
  • Good source of dietary fiber

Culinary Tips:

  • Onions can be sweated, sauted, caramelized, boiled, fried, baked, deep-fried, and grilled
  • Fresh onions can be eaten raw, or with little cooking
  • Stored onions generally require longer cooking times to optimize flavor

Recipes:

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PARSLEY

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Just above freezing, though your crisper should work well also
  • Stores 2 to 3 weeks

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in sodium and calories
  • High in vitamin K and folate.

Culinary Tips:

  • High in various vitamins and minerals
  • Freshly chopped parsley is delicious as a garnish on many different dishes
  • Works equally as well in stocks, soups and sauces

Recipes:

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Peppers

Peppers-purple.jpg

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 45 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores up to 3 weeks

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in sodium, zero cholesterol
  • High in vitamins A, C and potassium

Culinary Tips:

  • Crunchy texture and mixture of sweet and tangy flavor makes peppers an attractive culinary excursion whether raw or cooked
  • Preparing peppers is as easy as slicing the pepper open and removing the seeds and any other unwanted parts
  • Slice, dice or cube depending on need

Recipes:

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 Pumpkins

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 50-55 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores up to 3 months

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free
  • Excellent source of vitamin A
  • Good source of vitamin C

Culinary Tips:

  • Smaller pumpkins are best for eating
  • Pumpkin seeds are a fun, healthy treat
  • Shelled pumpkin seeds can be substituted for pine nuts

Recipes:

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Purple Cabbage

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Stores up to 6 months at 32 degrees Fahrenheit

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in calories
  • High in vitamins A and C
  • Notable levels of vitamin K and folate

Culinary Tips:

  • Firmer-textured leaves than green cabbages often calls for thinner slicing
  • Great for adding color to dishes
  • Adds variety to salads, slaws and stir-fry

Recipes:

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RADISH

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Topped radishes will store for up to 4 weeks at 32 degrees Fahrenheit

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, low sodium, cholesterol free, low calories
  • High in vitamin C

Culinary Tips:

  • Great as an hors d'oeuvres, complement, or garnish
  • Peeling radishes will result in a milder flavor
  • Slice off the roots and leaves and then slice, dice, mince or grate depending on your needs
  • Colorful cooking tip: to enhance the redness of radishes while cooking add a bit of lemon juice to the cooking liquid

Recipes:

Photo by Olivia Nava M.

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SCALLIONS

Storage:

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in calories and sodium
  • High in vitamins A and K, and Iron

Culinary Tips:

Recipes:
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Spinach

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Stores up to 2 weeks at 32 degrees Fahrenheit

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, low calorie
  • Excellent source of vitamin A
  • High in vitamin C, iron, folate, and dietary fiber
  • Good source of magnesium

Culinary Tips:

  • Super healthy, super versatile for use in salads, pastas, soups, dips, and bakes
  • Delicious raw or cooked, but overcooking degrades texture and nutrient content

Recipes:

Photo by Olivia Nava M.

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Sugar Snap Peas

Sugar-Snap-Peas.jpg

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Stores up to 2 weeks at 32 degrees Fahrenheit

Nutrition Information:

  • Excellent source of vitamin C
  • Good source of vitamin K.

Culinary Tips:

  • Delicious raw, steamed or in stir-fry
  • Snap off ends and remove string along inner spine
  • The rest of the pod can be eaten raw or cooked, whole or sliced

Recipes:

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Summer Squash

Storage:

  • 41-50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores less than 2 weeks

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, sodium free, cholesterol free, low calorie
  • High in vitamin C
  • Notable levels of B6, manganese and riboflavin

Culinary Tips:

  • The larger the squash the greater the water content
  • To reduce water content and enhance flavor, you can cut into slices, arrange in shallow dish, sprinkle with coarse salt, and allow to drain for 20-30 minutes. Then strain under cold water, pat dry, and continue with recipe
  • Most summer squashes are interchangeable with one another when it comes to recipes

Recipes:

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Sweet Corn

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Just above freezing, though your crisper should work well also
  • Stores 4-6 days

Nutrition Information:

  • Low fat saturated fat free, sodium free, cholesterol free
  • Good source of vitamin C

Culinary Tips:

  •  

Recipes:

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Sweet Potatoes

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 55-59 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores up to 1 year

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, low sodium, cholesterol free
  • High in vitamin A and C
  • Good source of dietary fiber and potassium

Culinary Tips:

  • Waiting to wash these potatoes until you are ready to use them will preserve their quality
  • Add to casseroles, soups and stews
  • Use to complement beef, poultry, and seafood
  • Sweet complement to other sweet veggies such as carrots, rutabagas, and parsnips

Recipes:

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Swiss Chard

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Just above freezing, though your crisper should work well also
  • Stores 1-2 weeks

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, cholesterol free
  • Excellent source of vitamins A and C
  • Good source of magnesium

Culinary Tips:

  • Stems and leaves are edible (remove bottom half-inch or so of stem)
  • Abundant supply of nutrients, so be sure you don't "overcook" the nutrients out
  • Don't use aluminum cook/kitchenware as it may diminish quality

Recipes:

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TOMATOES

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 66 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit for ripening; <55.4 degrees Fahrenheit slows ripening (use only for red tomatoes, can lead to damage for tomatoes that are not fully ripe
  • Storage time depends upon level of maturity when picked

Nutrition Information:

  • Low fat, saturated fat free, very low sodium, cholesterol free, low calorie
  • High in vitamins A and C
  • Good source of potassium

Culinary Tips:

  • Wash, slice and eat; or add to sandwiches and salads
  • Sun dry in the sun or oven for the classic sun-dried tomato (tip: to soften the texture of sun-dried tomato add EVO)

Recipes:

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Turnips

Varieties:

Storage:

  • Just above freezing
  • Stores 4-5 months

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, cholesterol free, low sodium
  • Excellent source of vitamin C

Culinary Tips:

  • Remove tops and ends when ready to prepare
  • Can be shredded, thinly sliced, or diced
  • Smaller turnips can be cooked whole, then hollowed, stuffed and baked

Recipes

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WATERMELON

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 50 - 59 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores up to 3 weeks

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, sodium free, cholesterol free
  • High in vitamins A and C

Culinary Tips:

Recipes:
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Winter Squash 

AcornSquash.jpg

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 50 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores 2-3 months

Nutrition Information:

  • Low in calories and sodium, zero cholesterol
  • Very high in vitamin A
  • High in vitamin C
  • notable levels of vitamin E, thiamine, B6, folate, iron, magnesium, potassium and manganese

Culinary Tips:

Recipes:
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ZUCCHINI

Varieties:

Storage:

  • 41 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Stores less than 2 weeks

Nutrition Information:

  • Fat free, saturated fat free, sodium free, cholesterol free, low-calorie
  • High in vitamin C.

Culinary Tips:

Recipes:

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